PDF Questions Preachers Ask: Essays in Honor of Thomas G. Long

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Johnston is Assistant Professor of Homiletics at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Austin, Texas.​ Leonora Tubbs Tisdale is the Clement-Muehl Professor of Homiletics at Yale Divinity School.​ Her research and teaching interests include: prophetic preaching, women and.
Table of contents

Billy Graham

If I do not, raise your hand anyway if you have a question or observation. Studying ancient Greek history gives us the chance to view in microcosm all the variablesthat affect the course of history at other times in other places. We can see human beings and human societies at their best and worst, understand how power works in human societies, weigh decisions and outcomes and how they are made, observe different kinds of political and economic systems, and consider how cultural values are shaped and what influence they have on what human beings do.

We shall study the origins of democracy and de-mystify what ancient democracy was. The history of Greece is also a history of warfare and competition.

We shall first look at the geography of Greece and how that affects cultural developments. How did these historical actors named and anonymous live within their world? We shall also puzzle over how to interpret the often very uneven and very peculiar evidence for the social, political and economic systems that develop in different districts of Greece in 'prehistoric' and historical times. We shall also read excerpts from authors like Homer and Hesiod epic poetry of two different kinds , Solon, Tyrtaeus, Callinus and Archilochus social song poets , Plutarch ancient biography , and Greek tragedians.

We shall rely on both textual and archaeological and iconographical evidence. Topics, depending on the interests of those enrolled, may include: 1 feasting and other communal ritual practices, like sacrifice, libations and offerings; 2 war and violence; 3 power and power figures; 4 economy and the mobilization of labor; 5 Mycenaean religion deities and other metaphysical notions: where they come from and where they go ; 6 palatial kingdoms and polis territories; 7 trade; 8 scripts and the effects of writing in society; 9 ethnicity; 10 music and the social functions of oral poetry.

We shall stress where such topics go, if anywhere, in later historical Greek cultures. During the last six weeks of the semester, we shall have as a distinguished visiting scholar Vassilis Petrakis, the foremost Mycenologist in Greece. Among the topics that Dr. Petrakis imagines taking up are the following.

Again, these can change to meet the interests of participants.


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Seminar 1 : The origins of Mycenaean civilization, including the basic notion that 'Mycenaean' describes a culture and that 'Mycenaeans' are not a single people, the MH background incl. Reference to the Minoan component in political ideology AND kingship , and to the fact that Minoan input is a sine qua non for the Mycenaean palace system in general. Seminars : The palatial era: how the system worked, regional differences important , eclectic control of regional economies and knowledge about the all-important non-palatial sector , what the tablets tell us about the political economies; basic topics on warfare, economy, trade and foreign contacts brief mention of warfare and foreign contacts will have been made in previous seminars as well.

Palatial crafts very briefly on wall-paintings, minor arts. Emphasis on the overall uniformity of palace culture as opposed to strong Early Mycenaean regionalism esp. Seminar 5 : Palatial collapse and postpalatial developments evidence for active manipulation of palatial recollections, e. Building T in Tiryns; the rise of pictorial pottery as a medium to replace wall-paintings. Finally, the historicity of Homeric material.

Participants will then go away with a strong framework and a detailed understanding of what the Mycenaean palatial period was and what it meant in and to later Greek culture and tradition, including the poems of Homer and Hesiod. This course can be taken without knowing or even caring to know Linear B. In this version of the course, students will benefit from two scholarly perspectives.

We are: Dr. Stephen Sonnenberg, a clinical psychoanalyst and humanities scholar who looks at how the experience of violence and war is mythologized and what effects such stories have; and Professor Tom Palaima, an ancient historian and specialist in how and why stories in many different forms about war and violence are created and used by individuals. Together Sonnenberg and Palaima have well over fifty years of deep concern for the human consequences of violent acts. We have collaborated on a wide variety of projects in the last few years and are very much looking forward to exploring the important issues in this course collectively.

We hope that all participants will explore these myths actively, understand how they are related to basic human psychological and social needs, and develop better their abilities to think critically about the nature of violence state-sanctioned in war and otherwise enacted , how violence affects individuals directly and indirectly, and what it does to the communities, small and large, in which human beings, like ourselves, live. A course booklet or on-line selections from some of the following: Book of Genesis , the sacrifice of Isaac; S.

Herr, Dispatches ; B. Peebles, Welcome to the Suck ; selected journalism and photojournalism; additional selected war poetry and essays by Whitman, Amichai, Hinojosa Smith, Patterson, Jarrell, Hemingway; etc. His research focuses on the points of intersection between psychoanalysis and other areas of scholarly inquiry.

Subjects of study include war, violence, decision-making, architecture and design, psychic trauma and post traumatic psychological disorders, addiction and the treatment of addiction, and education and effective teaching methods. Studying Greek history gives us the chance to view in microcosm all the variables that affect the course of history at other times in other places.

We can see human beings and human societies at their best and worst, understand how power works in human societies, observe different kinds of political and economic systems, and consider how cultural values are shaped and what influence they have on what human beings do. This course surveys Greek history from the palatial period of the late Bronze Age B. We shall puzzle over how to interpret the often very uneven and very peculiar evidence for the social, political and economic systems that develop in different districts of Greece in 'prehistoric' and historical times.

The course will consist of two hours of lecture per week plus a one-hour discussion section. Each member of a discussion section will have to lead discussion with a well-prepared handout at least once during the semester. We shall be reading in translation from masterworks of history and literature: Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plutarch, we shall also take into account documentary sources, including translated Linear B texts from the Greek Bronze Age and inscriptions of the historical period. We shall discuss carefully critical methods for interpreting primary sources.

However, it assumes no background knowledge of the subject and will combine survey of periods with in-depth discussion of particulars. There are no prerequisites. This course counts towards the major in Ancient History and Classical Civilization. You should sign up to be a group leader for one of the available discussion sessions. There will be no final examination in the examination period. Grading is on the regular "A"-"D," system no curve. Regular class participation will be noted under miscellaneous. Course Description: Greek mythology is mainly a public performance literature embedded in a still primarily oral culture.

Peter Meineck, trans. Aeschylus, Oresteia includes Agamemnon Hackett Syllabus, notes, background information, will all be available on Blackboard. Additional primary readings will be available on Blackboard also. Use office hours, too. We will cover enough basic grammar and vocabulary for you to begin reading short passages from a wide range of ancient Greek writers.

ANCIENT FAITHS AND MODERN:

Greek is the first half of a two-semester sequence that continues with Greek and prepares students to advance to Intermediate Greek GK and , where students read selected works by authors like Plato and Homer. Grades will be based on participation, homework, weekly quizzes, and four tests three midterms and a final. The Greeks used their myths as popular attempts to make sense of themselves and their world and to enjoy themselves.

Among these myths are top-ten all-time stories of sex and the ironies and savagery and honor of war The Iliad , The Trojan Women ; of sex, exotic adventure and bloody homecoming The Odyssey , of sex and the creation of the world Theogony , of sex and political outrage The Works and Days , of sex, murder and vengeance The Agamemnon , of sex, incest, voyeurism and cross-dressing The Oedipus Tyrannus and The Bacchae , of sex, politics and morality The Antigone , and of sex and detective fiction The Oedipus Tyrannus. Then as now, "sex, violence, action and mystery sell. In this course we shall read and discuss the great Greek myths in four ways.

First, to become familiar with them and how they worked within their culture.

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Second, to appreciate and enjoy them as great, but accessible works of the human mind. Third, to understand how they worked as tools to explain the world and what confused human beings—perhaps a redundancy—are doing in it. Fourth, to discuss what they mean for us and our problems—this is, after all, why they still survive. Syllabus, notes, background information will all be available on Blackboard.


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You can make up work missed for a religious holiday if you bring documentation of the holiday fourteen days ahead of time. Hemingway, For Whom the Bell Tolls. What do we know historically about the palaces where legendary kings like Minos, Agamemnon, Nestor and Priam ruled? When did the Greeks arrive in what has since been their homeland and how and why did their peculiarly innovative and influential culture develop?

Questions Preachers Ask (Scott Black Johnston, et al) -- Review

What do the so-called Minoan and Mycenaean cultures, on the island of Crete and the Greek mainland, owe to surrounding cultures, and how and why did these cultures come into contact? What kinds of evidence do we have from the so-called palatial period of Aegean prehistory the 2nd millennium BCE and how can we use it to ask historical questions? Formal study of Aegean prehistory is now over years old. One of the challenges for our understanding of the palatial palatial period reflected in later Greek historical texts like the Iliad, Odyssey, Works and Days, and Thucydides is to make sense of the material evidence recovered through excavation in conjunction with the data provided by peculiar documents mostly inscribed economically focused records on clay in writing systems known as Cretan Hieroglyphic, Linear A and Linear B that have been found at most major sites.

These documents have turned what used to be called a prehistoric period into what is now known as a proto-historic period. They present us with interesting problems concerning methods and principles of interpretation and historical reconstruction. In this course we will concentrate on how to make history or pre- and proto-history.

We shall try to trace political, social, economic and general cultural developments including such topics as religious beliefs, ethnicity, orality and literacy, law, regional and central power hierarchies, languages and dialects, trade, warfare, and cross-cultural borrowings and adaptations on Crete and the Greek mainland between roughly and BCE, with some look at Cyprus and Hittite Anatolia.

Spiritual and Pastoral Care Subject Guide

We shall try to define what history means in periods where we lack what we consider historical or annalistic works produced within the cultures we, as moderns, are studying. We shall ask questions most historians ask about human actions and the general quality of life in specific areas and time periods. And we shall consider the historiography of research in this field.


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Resources will include: 1 translated and transliterated documents in Linear A and Linear B, and excerpted passages from later Greek historical texts; 2 studies bearing upon the evidence derived from languages per se; 3 specialized articles on topics mentioned in general course description.